Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (946 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] Reading LTO cartridge memory
On 12/09/17 20:01, Greg Freemyer wrote:
On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 9:41 AM, Paul Groves <paul.groves.787@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Does anyone have a clue how to read the cartridge memory from an LTO tape?
Surely there must exist a command to do such a thing.
I too have fantasized about reading that data myself in the past.

Every LTO cartridge (including cleaning cartridges) is said to have a
cartridge memory. And every LTO drive has a non-contract cartridge
memory reader.
It is true. I repaired a cartridge with a mising leader pin so got a good look inside.

On the bottom of the cartridge on the label end opposite corner to the write protect tab there is a rf chip. If you look in the front of the drive just below the right hand edge you will see the receiver (labelled rf in my HP drive).

I have read up about it and apparently you can read /write the data by issuing SCSI commands. I would not have a clue how to do this.

look up CRCM2159.pdf from HP I would add a link to the file but I cannot because the mail list refuses it.
I'm not aware of any way for the host server to ask the LTO drive for
info originating there, nor to provide data to write there.
There must be a way because several backup programs can do it.
I want to add into my script the ability to read the serial number /
cartridge usage to be included in my log files.

Also, how do I set the barcode tag on the cartridge? I would also like to do
this in a script.
I'm not sure what you're asking.

Do you have a tape library with a built-in barcode reader? If so, I
think normally you physically attach the barcodes, then when you load
the media, the library inventories the tapes you loaded by reading the
barcodes.
The barcode tag on the LTO cartridge memory which electronically stores the barcode number. HP LTT shows this number if set.

All LTO drives can read this data from the chip as it is part of the LTO standard regardless of if they are in a library. The only reason I see to put the label on is for humans to read the cartridge, or perhaps for libraries to pick the tape cartridge without having to insert it and read the chip thinking about it.
So, the barcode is a physical label you have to attach.

Greg

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