Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (946 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] WD Green AV HD: rsync read errors mapping
On 01/09/17 06:53 PM, Anthony Youngman wrote:

Why do you assume it is *me* that does the inventing of such things?
Would you be so sceptical if you heard of IBM doing it, given that they have
already announced the manipulation of single atoms?  Go google?

Well, you did respond to my comment with "LOL", which to me implies disbelief.

And why this back reference to a _disk_ rather than  a crystal or lattice
array?

So I was just explaining in rather more detail. Yes it would be great if we
can
have your crystal or lattice memory, but I suspect it will suffer greatly from
quantum degradation :-(

I really think you missed my point.
The "LOL" was irony.

We already have atom level recording in the laboratory.
http://gizmodo.com/record-setting-hard-drive-writes-information-one-atom-a-1783740015
"Record-Setting Hard Drive Writes Information One Atom At a Time"

And this goes back to 2012
https://arxiv.org/abs/1202.1131
Which is important because the first article needs liquid nitrogen temperatures.

Let me pile irony on irony.
We'll use SATA and SCSI interfaces when the commercial versions are available
:-)

My original irony was 'what happens next'.


Yes you are right about degradation, but so what?
I'm old enough to remember using computers where the 'core' memory didn't
degrade when you turned to computer off. Not need for 'suspend to disk', you
just turned the power back on and it began running again from where it left off.

The we go that 'semiconductor' memory that lost it contents when you turned the
power off and people like you said how useless that was. Next along came memory
that forgot after a few seconds anyway so there had to be extra hardware to
refresh each 'row' periodically. I had a Z-80 based board with memory like
that.

Next along we had memory that flipped bits because of the trace radioactives in
the packaging, or was it cosmic rays? Or both? Or maybe it was quantum
effects, who knows. I think we dealt with that by including extra checksum bits
and using Hamming coding, all built in to the chip so that we never bothered
with it at a higher level. Or something.

Engineers are pretty good at solving problems.
And at creating them.
It goes hand in hand - ying/yang.


And heck, if we have quantum effect computers why not quantum effect memory?
Isn't that how the human brain works?

--
A: Yes.
> Q: Are you sure?
>> A: Because it reverses the logical flow of conversation.
>>> Q: Why is top posting frowned upon?


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