Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (1239 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] purging old kernels
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On 2013-06-11 12:49, Peter wrote:
I've just run into the problem of my /boot partition filling up due
to multiple kernel versions, but I don't understand how to resolve
it.

As with all my openSUSE installations of the last few years I
allotted only about 125MB to /boot having previously read that that
was more than sufficient, and I've never seen any official
recommendation to the contrary,

Mmm. Official?

Startup book:
<http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-startup/art.osuse.installquick.html#sec.osuse.installquick.install>

basically what it says is let the installer choose, and by default it
is only root, swap, and home. Not /boot.

+++······················
Define a partition setup for openSUSE in this step. In most cases a
reasonable scheme that can be accepted without change is proposed.
Accept the proposal with Next and proceed with the installation.
Experienced users can also customize the proposal (Edit Partition
Setup) or apply their own partitioning scheme (Create Partition Setup).
······················++-

Reference book:
<http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-reference/cha.inst.html#sec.i.yast2.partitioning>

+++······················
1.10. Suggested Partitioning¶

Define a partition setup for openSUSE in this step. In most cases a
reasonable scheme that can be accepted without change is proposed. If
a hard disk containing only Windows FAT or NTFS partitions is selected
as the installation target, YaST proposes to shrink one of these
partitions. Accept the proposal with Next and proceed with the
installation. Experienced users can also customize the proposal or
apply their own partitioning scheme.
······················++-

<http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-reference/cha.advdisk.html#sec.yast2.i_y2_part_expert>
3.1. Using the YaST Partitioner¶

There is more there, but I don't see any reference to a specific size
for /boot, only to create it on some circumstances.

+++······················
3.1.2.1. Btrfs Partitioning¶

If you want to use Btrfs and Storage Administration Guide, chapter
Overview of File Systems in Linux for more information on Btrfs) as
your default filesystem for a newly installed system, click
Partitioning on the Installation Settings screen, and check Use Btrfs
as Default Filesystem. The installation system then suggests creating
the /boot partition formatted with Ext3 filesystem, and the root /
partition formatted with Btrfs holding a default set of subvolumes,
which you can modify with the Expert Partitioner tool later.
······················++-


But yes, if you ask me, 150 MB is too little. Mine are 190 and they
are small. Nowdays, I would set for 1 GB, in case needs grow.

I use multiversion.

/etc/zypp/zypp.conf:

multiversion = provides:multiversion(kernel)
multiversion.kernels = latest-1,latest,running

This would mean 3 kernel versions just after an update, and back to
two after booting, when a systemd job (oS 12.3) kicks in and deletes
at least one, those not matching the rule above.

To be safe, manually delete versions when updating or before.

You can reduce needed space by removing plymouth from your
installation, but that's about it.

- --
Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)
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