Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (1231 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] own environment variables in init scripts
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Meike Stone said the following on 03/05/2013 09:45 AM:
2013/3/5 Anton Aylward <opensuse@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>:

If I'm understanding correctly, all this is in the context of Apache and
web services and not in the general context of J Random Program running
on the machine or cluster.

Yes and no. I like to set environment variables only for pathes, where
logging files can be placed (APACHE_LOG).
Accessed from vhost like:
CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG}/host1-access.log combined
But the same logging files are analyzed from other tools. So this
tools use the same Path (and so environment variable

There's the matter of getting things running and then apply 'finesse'


How Apache works together with hostnames and virtual host, that is
clear for me, also how name resolving works and how apache knows,
which vhost is responsible for a http(s) request. It is also important
to know that, because we use SSL and care for rfc4366 and SNI ;-)

I suspect you have a deeper problem.

SSL uses x.509 certificates and x.509 is remarkable Brian Dead[1], as is
much of the whole ISO approach to networking - Mike Padlipsky has a lot
to say on that subject, all very cutting and most of which has never
been refuted. In this instance the problem, with X.509 is that it does
not support aliases.

The Apache Vhosts mechanism is an IP sharing mechanism. It uses the
input from DNS and the client to decide which of the hosts sharing the
IP address is the instance to be used. There a line in the HTTP request
header that does this. See the docco. (but you know this, don't you?)

So what we have is a DNS mechanism that supports aliases. Think 'CNAME'.

While X.509 is Brian Dead; it won't support aliases. It thinks in terms
of "one ip address, one fqdn".

What this amount to is that with SSL you need a separate IP address for
each ... whatever we're calling it.

Yes, the Apache vhosts definition will allow this, but ...

Yes, you could do this by implementing virtual hosts, each with their
own IP address and each with their own fqdn and hece each each with
their own HOSTAME and /etc/HOSTNAME file.




[1] Go google. See 'Hacker's Dictionary' in particular.
--
Politically Correct Virus: Doesn't refer to itself as a virus - instead,
refers to itself as an "electronic microorganism." — Mark Kaye
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