Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (714 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] small installation help
Linux Tyro said the following on 10/30/2011 07:35 PM:

separate for root (/) and home (/home), is good (as you all say), but
separate for each like /boot, /tmp, /usr, ... should be done like
this...? I am really messed up with all this -- I consider Linux to be
very best, but installing first time and with experience it highly
troublesome...

You are making this into a big issue.

Do the install.
Wipe it; do it again with different partitions.
Do that four times a day for a week.
Now do it for a week with with LVM.

How else do you expect to learn if not by gaining experience.

Practice; try variation and compare the results; practice; experiment.



Still I try.

Okay, installer is smart enough to know all this things, and I would
go with the default options only, but I was trying to know somehow
what exactly was the purpose of having separate partitions and how
does it help....

The installer is dumb!
All it guarantees is that you will have enough space for a basic
(minimal) install. It can't read your mind, doesn't care about future
use or objectives.

http://bid.ankara.edu.tr/yardim/linux.install.guide/node68.html
<quote>
Why use more than one filesystem? The most commonly stated reason is
safety; if, for some reason, one of your filesystems is damaged, the
others will (usually) be unharmed. On the other hand, if you store all
of your files on the root filesystem, and for some reason the filesystem
is damaged, then you may lose all of your files in one fell swoop. This
is, however, rather uncommon; if you backup the system regularly you
should be quite safe.
</quote>

http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/685/why-put-things-other-than-home-to-a-separate-partition
<quote>
Because ordinary users can cause things to be written to /var and /tmp,
and thus potentially cause problems for the whole system. This way user
processes can fill up /var and /tmp, but not the root fs.
</quote>
<quote>
A folder I sometimes put on a separate partition is /usr/local/ so that
any software I've built and installed separately from my distro's
package manager could possibly be re-used if I change/upgrade my distro
or by another distro installed along side it. It's obviously not
guaranteed to work across all possible combinations but it does no harm.
</quote>

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/the-importance-of-linux-partitions.html
--
You have to learn to treat people as a resource......you have to ask not
what do they cost, but what is the yield, what can they produce?
--Peter F. Drucker
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