Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (2348 mails)

< Previous Next >
Re: [opensuse] complex confusing partition problem
  • From: "Carlos E. R." <robin.listas@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2008 15:20:32 +0200 (CEST)
  • Message-id: <alpine.LSU.1.00.0804031434160.2816@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1



The Wednesday 2008-04-02 at 21:58 -0400, Bob S wrote:

...

I then bought a 250 GB sata drive to install 10.3 on as I wanted to keep 10.2
on hdb and all of the storage on the hda drive. 10.3 installed flawlessly on
the saata drive. However after booting 10.3 a couple of times I decided to
copy over some of my stuff from the 10.2 install. To my amazement, when I
clicked on 10.2 in the grub menu, it brought up another grub menu with two
instances of 10.2. Each of them booted and opened up. One instance was
complete and performed perfectly the other opened and looked fine. Same
desktop schemes etc. as the good one. But none of my /home info was there and
It would not open any of the apps I had installed, would not print, etc. etc.

Another install you forgot about, probably.


Now, when I installed 10.3 the libata thing came into play. It made the new
sata disk sda. then it took the ide disks and renamed hda to sdb and the hdb
disk and renamed it sdc. (I complained bitterly to the list but it made no
difference)

No...

One thing that helps is to have all partitions "labeled". Some of your old partitions have labels, but not the new ones in the new disk.


So now I look at the grub menu.lst for both instances of 10.2 and they are
exactly the same. NOTE: I renamed the good 10.2 to plain "SUSE" for clarity
and so I could choose the proper instance from the second grub menu.
Following is the grub menu:

We'd need to look at the big disk grub, too (the 10.3 system).

Boot your 10.3, and copy-paste the /boot/grub/menu.lst file and the /boot/grub/device.map file. Then boot each 10.2 and do the same.

--------------------------------
# Modified by YaST2. Last modification on Tue Sep 18 19:13:07 EDT 2007
default 0
timeout 8
gfxmenu (hd1,0)/boot/message

###Don't change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title openSUSE 10.2
root (hd1,0)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hdb1 resume=/dev/sda3 splash=silent
showopts initrd /boot/initrd

title SUSE
root (hd2,0)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 resume=/dev/sda3 splash=silent
showopts initrd /boot/initrd


I think you have 10.3 in sda8, and a 10.2 in sda1 (big disk).



-----------------------------------------------
Note that root is different between SUSE and SUSE 10.2. Also, /dev/sda1
should actually be 10.3 ( I think) So now I look at the fstab for both. They
are quite different. Following is for the good instance designated SUSE
-----------------------------------------------
/dev/sda1 / ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 1
/dev/sda7 /fat vfat
users,gid=users,umask=0002,utf8=true 0 0
/dev/sda2 /home ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/sda6 /tmp ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/sda5 /var ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/sda3 swap swap defaults 0 0

This is 10.2 in /dev/sda1, I think.

/dev/hda2 /workspace ext3 user,acl 1 2
/dev/hda3 /datastorage ext3 defaults 1 2

That's /dev/sdb in the photo.

/dev/hda1 /windows vfat

/dev/hdb1 /boot ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 0

This could be... ugh! ... could be /dev/sdc1 in the photo. That's a 10 GB partition dedicated to /boot of your 10.2 system in /dev/sda1 !


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BUT....Look at the first 5 lines. They say /dev/sda*. That can't be, /dev/sda
is SUSE 10.3. So now I look at the fstab for 10.3 and I get this
unintelligible mess:
---------------------------------------------------------------

Yes, sda1 is 10.2, and sda8 is 10.3. Not what you expected.

Somehow you have a 10.2 (and a 10.3) in your new disk, and another 10.2 in your old disk.


/dev/sda8 / ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 1
/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_ST380011A_5JVQS2KB-part5 /backup ext3
defaults 1 2
/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_ST380011A_5JVQS2KB-part3 /datastorage ext3


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
So continuing on: The following is for the bogus SUSE 10.2
But it looks like it should except that the LVM's don't show. There is however
a ~fstab which does show the LVM's.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know nothing about LVM, sorry.

/dev/hdb1 / ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 1

This is sdc in the photo.

/dev/hdb2 /home ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/hdb7 /opt ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/hdb8 /tmp ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/hdb5 /usr ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/hdb6 /var ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
/dev/hda1 /windows/C vfat

because the fat partition is in sdb.

So, the "bogus" 10.2 is really your old 10.2, broken because the LVM is not active, probably.

users,gid=users,umask=0002,utf8=true 0 0
/dev/sda7 /windows/D vfat
users,gid=users,umask=0002,utf8=true 0 0
/dev/sda3 swap swap defaults 0 0

So, sda here is also sda in the photo.



So now I look at my partitioner and of course there is no hda or hdb but it
does seem to reflect the partitioning accurately. But no LVM and no
explanation for the dual appearances of 10.2. I have attached the screen shot
of the partitioner. Hopefully it will survive the censors. If not I can put
it up on the web for viewing if anyone wants to see it.

Got ok.

I think some "ghost fairy" cloned your lvm 10.2 into your new SATA drive, disabled the lvm, reconstructed the fstab the "bogus" 10.2 (thus the references to sda there), and installed 10.3 in the SATA (big disk).


I want to keep my SUSE (10.2) and get rid of the bogus SUSE 10.2 because it is
solid and complete. Better yet it would be great to get everything in one
single grub menu before I install 11.0. I have no idea on how to proceed,or to
delete what partitions because libata changed all of the names. The
partitioner will show the setup clearly.

Hopefully the guru's out there can analyze this and come up with a solution

You need a good one!

You have over 100 GB not partitioned in your big disk, you can use that to move over things and repartition your old disks fresh.

A proposal about what you can actually do... dunno, not yet. Let's wait for more comments.


- -- Cheers,
Carlos E. R.

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v2.0.4-svn0 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFH9NmntTMYHG2NR9URAr+KAJ98PEbh6gzLn3UCHEXuMidmDniuigCfTcCl
z/TThOoSn8otoXv4wxbhH+0=
=U3bL
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
--
To unsubscribe, e-mail: opensuse+unsubscribe@xxxxxxxxxxxx
For additional commands, e-mail: opensuse+help@xxxxxxxxxxxx

< Previous Next >
Follow Ups
References