Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3767 mails)

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Re: [SLE] Question about 'net connection/sharing
  • From: "suse_gasjr4wd@xxxxxxx" <suse_gasjr4wd@xxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:35:56 -0500
  • Message-id: <C006A1FC.19C1D%suse_gasjr4wd@xxxxxxx>
On 2/1/06 5:51 AM, "Paul Alfille" <palfille@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> On Wednesday 01 February 2006 12:14 am, suse_gasjr4wd@xxxxxxx wrote:
>> On 1/31/06 11:20 PM, "JB" <yonaton@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>>> Hi gang,
>>>
>>> My girlfriend recently got satellite internet. Her daughter of course
>>> needs to use it also (as will I soon).
>>> I thought a router would be the thing to use for all 3 of us to hook
>>> into to use the 'net, but a friend here said a hub/switch will be just
>>> fine. Which is better? Which would allow all 3 of us to be 'online' at
>>> the same time the best (meaning, which/what would try to even out the
>>> bandwidth we use if all 3 of us were online at one time?)? Is the switch
>>> good enough? It seems to be working well enough for the two of them as it
>>> is, but I'm just curious if there's something that might be any better.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> JB
>>
>> There is a big difference in a hub, a router, and a switch.
>>
>> A hub shares the bandwidth with each computer connected. (the more
>> computers connected, the slower each is.)
>>
>> A switch gives each computer the full 100Bt connection speed. (or what ever
>> your network is.)
>>
>> A router* does just what the name implies.
>>
>> *Some routers have a 5 or 8 switch built in...
>>
>>
>> What you want is a switch. They are very, very cheap nowadays.
>> (think "down the road"...get a gigabit switch)
>> $20 such as:
>> http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=313920&pfp=ca
>> t 3
>>
>> Now, after all that's said, I don't think you will notice any speed
>> difference in just sharing the satellite connection with not going gigabit.
>> ;)
>> The speed can't be THAT fast... It just makes more sense ($) to get a
>> gigabit if you are going to buy something.
>
> Hate to disagree, but I think you really wanted a Router, probably with a
> firewall built it, and possibly with wireless capabilities as well.
>
> Typically, the service provider only allows you to have a single IP address,
> usually dynamically assigned. They think that corresponds to one computer.
>
> The router will do NAT, making all the internal computers look like one
> external one. It will also limit how much of your internal network is visible
> from the outside. Most routers also include a 4-port switch.
>
> Prices are under $100 US.
>
> Some routers even have embedded linux internally, and there are projects that
> allow custom versions of linux with special features. See OpenWRT.org
>
> Paul Alfille

UG! You are right!

Sorry about that. I was thinking of another list-situation.
(and I've sworn off coffee - going cold turkey sucks)
Maybe I assumed there was a firewall installed? I don't know - what I was
thinking.


Yes, everyone needs some type of firewall-router.


You can get the the consumer grade ones very cheap... Free (or close to it)
after rebates a lot of the time. Watch those Sunday sale papers.
We have everything form D-Link to Netgear to Linksys to Hawking.
They are all just about the same...
Just do your self a favor and get a separate hardware item as above. Running
a firewall in software on your computer (or each one) is a PIA. For the $20
they maybe, it will be the best few bucks you ever spend.


Serves me right for doing things late and fast.


Ill shut up now...
;)


--
Thanks,
George


Best to keep your mouth closed and let people think you're an idiot than
to open it and remove all doubt.



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