Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3666 mails)

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Re: [SLE] Hardisksize
  • From: Mike McMullin <mwmcmlln@xxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 21 Mar 2005 02:27:39 -0500
  • Message-id: <1111390058.6147.76.camel@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
On Mon, 2005-03-21 at 01:17, Erik Jakobsen wrote:
> Mike McMullin wrote:

{snippage}

> > Short answer is yes. Things to consider are: boot loader
> >configuration, fstab settings, having a /home directory in each
> >install. I assume you are using one swap partition.
> >
> >
> >
> Thanks for a fast reply Mike. Can you tell me more about the things to
> consider ?.
>
> I have a /home each place. What to take care of here ?.
>
> /etc/fstab for 9.2
>
> /dev/hda1 / reiserfs
> acl,user_xattr 1 1
> /dev/hda3 /data1 auto
> noauto,user 0 0
> /dev/hda2 swap swap
> pri=42 0 0
> devpts /dev/pts devpts
> mode=0620,gid=5 0 0
> proc /proc proc
> defaults 0 0
> usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs
> noauto 0 0
> sysfs /sys sysfs
> noauto 0 0
> /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom subfs
> fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,nosuid,
> nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0
> /dev/dvdrecorder /media/dvdrecorder subfs
> fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,nosuid,
> nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0
> /dev/fd0 /media/floppy subfs
> fs=floppyfss,procuid,nodev,
> nosuid,sync 0 0



> Overview of the HDD:
>
> Disk /dev/hda: 163.9 GB, 163928604672 bytes
> 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19929 cylinders
> Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
>
> Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
> /dev/hda1 * 1 2550 20482843+ 83 Linux
> /dev/hda2 2551 2679 1036192+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
> /dev/hda3 2680 19928 138552592+ 83 Linux
>
> Spaceview:
>
> Disk /dev/hda: 163.9 GB, 163928604672 bytes
> 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19929 cylinders
> Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
>
> Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
> /dev/hda1 * 1 2550 20482843+ 83 Linux
> /dev/hda2 2551 2679 1036192+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
> /dev/hda3 2680 19928 138552592+ 83 Linux
> linux:~ # df
> Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
> /dev/hda1 20482184 18054904 2427280 89% /
> tmpfs 257816 24 257792 1% /dev/shm
>
> After that, what to do now ?

If I've got this right you have 9.2 on hda1 swap on hda2 and 9.1 on
hda3. Assuming that you're giving all of your 9.1 space over to 9.2,and
that it's also reiser, you need to add a section to 9.2's fstab mounting
it. I'm saying also reiser, but it doesn't have to be, what ever system
you've got it formatted under is fine, you want the space. So what room
are you running out of? Obviously the big space killer could be the
/home directories. I have this on it's own partition so if I upgrade I
won't have to lose my data, and if I run out of space, I can put in a
larger disk, copy the /home over (fixing the ownerships!!!!!) and keep
using disk space.

Assuming that you'll turn hda3 over to /home, you'll want to manually
mount it, I suggest under either /media or /mnt, see man mount for
details on how to. Konqi on over to the partition , you'll more than
likely want to do a kdesu konqueror, and remove any and all files
(directories are files) copy the directories under your /home over to
the new space, and to a safe place on hda1, archive them if you need
to. If something goes south we'll have trashed your /home permanently.


Here's my fstab entry for my /home partition:
/dev/hdc2 /home reiserfs defaults 1 2
and here's the one just above it for my / partition
/dev/hdc3 / reiserfs acl,user_xattr 1 1


The disk logic looks like this: hdc3 contains /home as a mount point for
/hdc2 which contains any user data in their respective home/username
directory. You'll want to right click (in konqi) on the new directories
and opt for the properties tab, and fix the ownership section to read
the correct user name and group of "users", apply changes to all
subfolders and their contents. When I did this under 9.1 the .files
didn't change and I had to open a root console and (man) chown
Mike:users on the.files in each directory, the .directories too I think.

If it tanks, you can of course edit your fstab to delete the mounting of
the other partition for your /home, and (man) su to (man) umount the
/home partition, and then extract the archived /home back into place.
You may need to fix ownerships on the files, but your data should be
safe.

And remember, it never, ever hurts to have backups. :)


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