Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3217 mails)

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Re: [SLE] Re: Hardware question...
  • From: expatriate <lbox@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2004 16:53:59 +0000
  • Message-id: <40436AA7.4030604@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>


James Hatridge wrote:

Hi all...

On Thursday 26 February 2004 19:05, expatriate wrote:

James Hatridge wrote:

Hi all...

I've got a hub and the transformer burned up. So as a replacement I got
the type that has multi-value for the volts, ie from 0 to 12v. My hub
uses 5v, but the transformer has only 4.5 and 6v. I put the dial about
between the two. It works, but is this good? It also works when I set it
at 6v, but could this be too much? Any ideas?

Thanks

JIM

Try it on 4.5. If it works, leave it there. Are you sure that the knob
does vary the voltage continuously between the 4.5 and 6.0 setting? If
it does, the middle is OK. 6V is probably OK too, just feel the hub and
see if it gets too warm.

How did the old transformer burn up? Too much load on it?


I guess so... I use it for my 8 node 'wulf. When I have all 8 nodes going at speed the hub is more than hand warm. BTW it's a D-Link DSH-8 hub. A few days ago I had only a couple of the nodes up and running, just moving some files around no big thing. I went outside to get the mail etc. Came back inside and could smell that burning plasic smell. I'm sure everyone here knows it. I looked around and the transformer brick looked like it was designed by Dali. <G>
Anyway I'm stuck with this hub until I can score a switch. BTW does anyone have an old usable 8 to 16 node switch laying around? I could go up to 10$ plus postage for a usable one.
Thanks,


JIM


Back in my other job we used to buy these "cheap" bricks that were supposed to work at 110-240V, 50-60Hz. Unfortunately, they were blowing up at European customer sites. The transformer's impedance was just too low at 50Hz. It seems your hub is taking in a lot of current too. As other posters have mentioned make sure that the current rating of the brick exceeds the current rating of the hub. I've never had a hub get hotter than my hand can hold. Putting on my paranoid schizophrenic hat I would measure the current drawn by the hub as you plug in each node. Maybe the problem is a ground loop produced by one of the computers you're plugging in. My 10-node Linksys hub never gets too warm to the touch.





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