Mailinglist Archive: yast-devel (63 mails)

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Re: [yast-devel] Services UI, a different approach
  • From: Ancor Gonzalez Sosa <ancor@xxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2015 11:40:26 +0100
  • Message-id: <54FD789A.3030406@suse.de>
On 03/09/2015 10:42 AM, Johannes Meixner wrote:

Hello,

On Mar 5 16:22 Ancor Gonzalez Sosa wrote (excerpt):
https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1cVv4FY4tWRLAnMG96Cdfvw8asTNpzhFUdKn4TEq8HYI/edit


If the user want to enable and start a service he needs
to do both things explicitly (and the other way around).

Is this user interface meant for experienced users
or also for unexperienced users?

That's something I have been discussing with Ken 30 minutes ago. We
cannot be everything for everybody. Maybe I'm oversimplifying but I see
three big groups of users.

1) Linux newbies. They may not know the difference between enabled and
started.
2) Advanced linux users including sysadmins. They know the concepts and
the different services that exist. Maybe they are quite proficient
managing some services but they don't know everything about every service.
3) Hardcore ultrageek sysadmins who really really really know that they
are doing.

Ken and me seem to agreed that, although some parts of YaST could be
newbie oriented, the modules for configuring services are probably not.
Most of those users will probably not even need to run a service and if
they do, they would eventually need to learn about some basic concepts
in the process.

The third group will probably never use YaST or will never admit they do
it, at least. :-)

So IMHO, we should focus on users that really know the difference
between started and enabled. We should come up with an interface that
makes sense for the most common use cases without unexpected behaviors,
but we should not assume that they lack the basic knowledge about how a
service works in Unix.

And I'd say (maybe just my personal feeling) that most users in group
(2) would appreciate if YaST does not overdo.

What I am thinking about is:
When an unexperienced user reads in whatever documentation
that he must for example "start apache", then YaST should
provide a user interface, where even an unexperienced user
can find something that matches his intent to "start apache"
where YaST does everything so that the "apache" thingy works.
Perhaps such a functionality belongs to a YaST module
to set up a web server and not to the YaST module to
configure individual services?
In this case the YaST module to configure individual services
is not meant to be used by unexperienced users.


Kind Regards
Johannes Meixner


--
Ancor González Sosa
YaST Team at SUSE Linux GmbH
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