Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-translation (119 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-translation] Tools to help the translation teams
  • From: "Carlos E. R." <robin.listas@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:23:15 +0100 (CET)
  • Message-id: <alpine.LSU.1.00.0803021319570.24930@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
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The Friday 2008-02-29 at 17:50 +0100, Vincent Untz wrote:

[ Third resend - the list silently discards my email :-( ]

Hi,

Let me first introduce myself, since I just subscribed to this list. I'm
a GNOME hacker, and with my new job, I'll be working on openSUSE. Since
I want my desktop in a perfect french, I'm quite interested in
translation, although I don't have time to translate.

Welcome!

...

In the french translation team, we also have vertimus:
https://code.launchpad.net/vertimus (upstream project)
http://gnomefr.traduc.org/suivi/ (server used for GNOME french
translation)
It's a tool to let the team work in a more efficient way. Basically, it
lets people reserve a module for translation. When it's translated, the
translator uploads a po file which is then proofreads by someone else.
If everything is fine, it gets marked as "ready for commit" and someone
with commit powers commits it. It gets all the statistics about modules
from Damned Lies. We're trying to have the tool a bit more generic so it
can be used by other teams.

This sounds very interesting.

[...]

What I miss is a... perhaps some screen shots of vertimus at work. I had a
look under <http://gnomefr.traduc.org/suivi/>, but I can't see how it
works, perhaps because I'm not a french translator (obviously.)

A member of the Spanish team (Gabriel) has designed, and we are testing, a
web tool for a similar task, and, at first glance, it would seem we are
duplicating efforts. We have a test site, but I won't publish it here
(I leave that for him).

So, I think it would be interesting to be able to really compare
capabilities.


Now, we're also interested in pootle and transifex:
http://translate.sourceforge.net/wiki/pootle/index
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/Transifex
https://hosted.fedoraproject.org/transifex
Pootle allows translators to translate po files in a web application,
with translation memory and other cool stuff.
Transifex makes it easier to commit a file, using a web form. (this
simplifies things since it doesn't require svn/cvs/git/blabla access for
translators and they don't have to learn about vcs if they don't want
too).

Interesting. I have seen questions about similar tools.

Note that we've not integrated those two tools yet, but they look
promising to us. Integrating Transifex shouldn't be too hard. Pootle is
harder, though. Oh, and the goal would be to have those tools optional,
so translators can still use svn if they don't like Transifex.


On the openSUSE side, I have the feeling that we could make use of
Transifex in the short term, and maybe vertimus too. And perhaps Pootle
in the long term. I'd like to hear what you think of all this.

Very interesting :-)

I hope I didn't write too many stupid things ;-)


No! :-)


Actually, there is another tool I'm very interested in: a man page editor.

And no, I don't consider vi or emacs as valid editors (I come from long
time usage of Borland IDEs, word star style: so I simply can not use
neither vi or emacs proficiently)

Programmers seem to be happy using a plain text editor to create troff
markup for man pages. But translators are not programmers, or not all of
them (I was a msdos/win programmer, I'm not a linux programmer: thus I
translate for linux).

There are no tools for this.

There is manedit (http://www.battlefieldlinux.com/wolfpack/ManEdit/) which
is old and not actively maintained: for instance, it lacks utf8 support,
and has to be fired from a latin1 xterm or the keyboard fails. It doesn't
have spell checking, for instance, and does not understand some of the
tokens.

mcedit understands the syntax and colours it: but it gives the troff
tokens to the speller, which is a real nuisance. jstar understands the
syntax as well, but refuses to use the system aspell.

LyX would be very nice: but the "manpage" template depends on linuxdoc
and doesn't work at all. Hasn't worked in years!, in fact, and there is no
substitute manpage template for docbook.

No, writing a manpage in docbook XML is not a good idea. I tried. I know
nothing of XML editing, found it too hard, harder than plain troff, and
run away.


So... if somebody at Novell, involved in translations, could convince some
developers to develop a a WYSIWYG man page editor (text mode is fine!),
with spell check support (plus local dictionary), then we could start
convincing translators to actively translate manpages: some of them are
really obsolete.

O:-)

- -- Cheers,
Carlos E. R.

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