Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-factory (838 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-factory] work for the future: why do you still use Windows
On 08/03/11 14:37, jdd wrote:
Le 08/03/2011 13:55, Sid Boyce a écrit :


As someone who ditched Windows back in the glory days of Windows 95, I
would like to turn the question completely the other way around and ask
why you still use Linux.
There must be very positive and compelling reasons.

right now I use dualboot to keep full power for HD video editing in
Windows and Windows in virtualbox for gadjets sync.

95% of my work is done with openSUSE.

But, as I said, my mother, some of her friends and my sister in law
(all 70" and up) can't use openSUSE because the power point slideshow
reading. And I can't ask this kind of people to dualboot :-). And, byt
ther way, this makes me have to manage Windows Vista, what I hate!

What make me try this thread is that the problem is often obviously
small (I'm pretty sure than two qualified people could solve it in
some weeks), so it could be solved if we wants. But I'm also sure we
can"'t solve *all* the problems of this sort, so we have to choose.
And so to know between what choose. May be it's much more important to
solve the opennote problem (that donc have meaning for me but may have
for many others).

My goal is to identify the problems, sort them and make public what
could be the priorities.

And it's not a bugfix problem, nothing that can be solved so easily,
that's why I openned files in openfate, not in bugzilla.

Of course, once the priorities will be done, bugzilla will have all
it's importance.

jdd


That's OK, but there are so many things to cause a Linux wish list to crash Windows.

I have guys in their 70's and 80's using Linux for all sorts of stuff.
Long before it became OpenOffice I was using StarOffice for all the Powepoint presentations I delivered to colleagues and customers and I have yet to come across any issues. The occasional issue with Word and Excel formatting in the early days did occur.

Every time I thought they'd force me back to using Windows, along came Citrix client for Linux, Cisco VPN client for Linux and wine to run Lotus Notes - all required to do the day job.

Even when Disney asked Adobe to port Photoshop to Linux they weren't successful and they had to turn to Codeweavers. There were many petitions to Adobe from Linux users, pointing out that under Linux and Executor (the Mac emulator) we could run Photoshop, all to no avail for ages and when they offered to port it, few were interested as alternatives were available. The same situation occurred with Adaptec until the guys were so close and had only made 2 wrong assumptions which did not affect the ability to use their products under Linux.

There were also lots of stuff I could do in Linux that I couldn't do in Windows and I noted that if something couldn't be done in Windows it caused no gripes, a fruitless exercise in any case as there is no one to listen, so you take what's given and work within the limits they set.
Those types of companies either don't want to upset Microsoft or they see open source as a threat.

In the SDR (Software Defined Radio) world recently we came across an issue where on a piece of hardware, No Windows version supports UAC2 (USB Audio Class 2) which restricts Windows users with UAC1 to inferior audio sampling rates compared to OSX and Linux unless they spent thousands of dollars to buy a driver under a NDA or purchase a $600.00 sound card with the manufacturer's driver against the $150.00 for the hardware on offer. Of course someone could write a UAC2 driver for Windows, a pretty big task which is unnecessary in the case of OSX and Linux.
Regards
Sid.
--
Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks

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