Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (856 mails)

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[opensuse] Re: showing system threads
Marc Chamberlin wrote:
Hi Linda and thanks for the suggestion. I tried htop also, and no joy with it either. Though I am not sure what the "H" and "K" keys do when I use them. It appears that what they do is simply force an update, but I don't see any change in the output that differentiates between user and kernel threads.
---
Then something is broken on your machine.

There is an option in Setup (F2) to change the color of threads,
but it appears it is for all threads.

But the system threads that disappear are not on the first screen
(use the PageUp/PageDn keys to scroll pages, PageUp key to scroll up)

If you want a solution to your problem, You'll be able to see what threads disappear or not, in this tools

If I press "H", I see threads from transmission appearing/disappearing.

You can see the effect (configuration-wise) by looking at "Setup
and Display Options and see if Hide userland and/or hide kernel threads
options have an 'x' next to them.

If you have kernel-threads displayed, you would see them (I count
51 different types, 308 kernel threads total):

bioset
cpuhp
crypto
deferwq
dio
dm-thin
dm_bufio_cache
edac-poller
ixgbe
kauditd
kblockd
kcompactd0
kcompactd1
kcopyd
kdevtmpfs
kdmflush
khugepaged
khungtaskd
kintegrityd
kipmi0
kpsmoused
ksmd
ksoftirqd
kswapd0
kswapd1
kthreadd
kthrotld
kvm-irqfd-clean
kworker
lru-add-drain
migration
netns
oom_reaper
rcu_bh
rcu_preempt
rcu_sched
scsi_eh_0
scsi_eh_1
scsi_tmf_0
scsi_tmf_1
vmstat
watchdog
watchdogd
writeback
xfs-buf
xfs-cil
xfs-conv
xfs-data
xfs-eofblocks
xfs-log
xfs-reclaim
xfs_mru_cache
xfsaild
xfsalloc

------
Those are the 1st word with parts after '/' chopped off -- still got
a few dups w/scsi using '_', and a few others not using a separator
char like kswap & kcompact -- but those are likely due to
my machine having a NUMA memory layout associated with having
2 physical cpu-chips. Many of the threads come from needing
a separate thread for each "Core", while others come from needing
a separate thread for each block device you have a file system
on.
You can also see the kernel threads in "ps" using something
like:

ps -efl

The kernel threads have square brackets '[]' around the process name
(having brackets in the arguments section doesn't count).

But some xfs/block dev threads:
[xfsaild/dm-0]
[xfsaild/dm-12]
[xfsaild/dm-14]
[xfsaild/dm-1]
[xfsaild/dm-2]
[xfsaild/dm-3]
[xfsaild/dm-4]
[xfsaild/dm-5]
[xfsaild/dm-6]
[xfsaild/sdc1]
[xfsaild/sdc2]
[xfsaild/sdc3]
[xfsaild/sdc6]
[xfsaild/sdc8]

Some per-cpu threads:
[ksoftirqd/0]
[ksoftirqd/10]
[ksoftirqd/11]
[ksoftirqd/1]
[ksoftirqd/2]
[ksoftirqd/3]
[ksoftirqd/4]
[ksoftirqd/5]
[ksoftirqd/6]
[ksoftirqd/7]
[ksoftirqd/8]
[ksoftirqd/9]

In "top" (and htop) the threads don't show the brackets -- but both tools show threads --
user and system.

Another way of looking at these -- if you see a bunch of
duplicate looking processes, ask if they correspond
to a program you are running -- usually they won't.





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