Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (856 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] interesting reading about systemd
On 2016-10-03 14:32, Per Jessen wrote:
Carlos E. R. wrote:


I don't have (big) problems with systemd. I think. In general, I'm
happy. Well, perhaps that if there is a problem I can not edit an
script and solve it. I have to wait for the devs to solve and
distribute it. Ie, little problems are now more difficult to hack or
solve for the administrator.

Can you come up with an example of that, Carlos? I think you're wrong.
systemd has better options than editing the script - a service unit is
easily overridden etc.

Yes, sure.

I had problems with umounting some filesystem and systemd instantly
remounting it on my back. Or the other way round.

One that is hard to reproduce: during halt, network was disconnected,
then the process decided to umount an nfs mount. Obviously, it could
not, and got stuck. On the end, I had to hit the power button.


Perhaps have an easy to find document, a FAQ, would help: I have this
problem, what do I do? Not a long documentation to study and
comprehend, but something practical and to the point, with actual
examples to copy and use.

Like: How do I start something before/during/after boot/after some
other service. It is a question often asked: this week, I think.

Maybe it exists, but I wouldn't know where.

It's most likely in the man page(s), but I agree they can be a bit long
and not always easy to grok.

What you need to look at are the After, Requires, and Wants directives.

Yes, I know, but I'm talking about a FAQ that I can read and point
people to. I do not want to study a long documentation in order to
figure out what to do. And that was just an example of possible things
to do with systemd, there are many more. The suse.doc page gets close.

Yes, I know that the info is there. But too long. Man pages typically do
not have examples, and you have to know what page to open first.

--
Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

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