Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (1420 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] Blu Ray Copying
Thanks for the response. I think I found a definitive answer, which surprised
me because there are very expensive recorders that bulk store one's own blu
rays for both faster, indexed playback; as well as for solving storage area
problems with large blu ray and dvd collections like mine. I was aware that it
has always been legal to make backups of media one owns for their own archival
purposes, but after a web search, it is clear that it is illegal to possess or
use the software that can decrypt the media to store them. That really sucks
because my storage and retrieval has become so unwieldy that I often give up
looking for disks I own.

Thank you for providing the technical answer, and this clearly isn't a forum
for discussing legalities or moralities related to this question. I have
always been absolute on refusal to copy any media I don't own, but it appears I
would be risking too much to make copies.

Regards,

Jim

Thus spake iPad.


On Jan 8, 2014, at 6:22 PM, John Layt <johnlayt@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

On 8 January 2014 22:10, Jim Sabatke <jsabatke@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
I hope this is an appropriate subject for this list. I have an idea to buy
a large disk array with a high speed USB card for my desktop and copy my Blu
Ray disk collection to the disks and then have the desktop serve them to my
media center.

I have researched this on Google and it seems possible, but I've tried so
many things that people say work and it turns out they don't, and I can't
afford to make a mistake.

If anyone would know if this can be done considering the copy protection on
the disks I would appreciate any insights. I am already doing this with
DVDs that are NOT copy protected by copying each DVD to its own directory.
I haven't worked out how to serve them to any of my A/V media yet, but I can
use kaffeine. I know there are boxes for accessing media over networks
though devices like Roku.

Firstly, usual disclaimers apply, in some jurisdictions doing this is
illegal, it is your responsibility to check if you are allowed to do
this, don't hold me responsible if the NSA reports you to the MPAA,
etc. Secondly, while a number of options are being worked on to allow
native access, such as VLC, they all eventually run into the problem
that they need a DRM key to allow them to decrypt the protected
blu-rays. No-one has reverse-engineered a key yet, and even if they
did they can be blacklisted on future blu-rays.

There is one app however that is legal in its home country and so has
managed to get a key, and it runs on Linux. This is MakeMkv, which
allows you to rip the movie to a .mkv file which can be played by most
media players, or to stream from the blu-ray directly. It also works
for DVDs. MakeMkv is closed source and requires a licence key, but is
currently free while in beta. You can install it from an OBS repo at
[1], then get the required key at [2].

After the initial rip, if the mkv files are too big (it rips at 100%
quality) then use something like HandBrake to reduce the size/quality.
If you plan to have a separate HTPC box then I recommend using XBMC
for the front-end, and sharing the files via nfs or smb shares. DLNA
is also an option.

John.

[1] http://software.opensuse.org/package/makemkv?search_term=makemkv
[2] http://www.makemkv.com/forum2/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1053
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