Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (1231 mails)

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[opensuse] Re: Grub vs LILO
ellanios82 wrote:
Hello List

- see from

http://www.differencebetween.net/technology/software-technology/difference-between-grub-and-lilo/


1.GRUB is a boot loader which can be used for Linux, vSTA, DOS, and
other operating systems while LILO is a generic boot loader for Linux.

2.Both GRUB and LILO can boot operating systems from external devices
such as floppy disks and hard drives, but 3.GRUB allows booting from a
network while LILO does not.
---
Interesting. I've never used anything (for any long period of
time) other than lilo and I have configured linux systems to boot from the
net as a proof of concept -- it wasn't real fast, but it did work.

Also under the 'elilo' section, for booting from EFI systems,
a note says "It supports network booting using TFTP/DHCP". I used
TFTP when I did my config.

4.When the configuration file is altered, LILO needs to be reinstalled
to the MBR while GRUB defaults to its command line interface.
----
Not true. The MBR isn't re-written, but lilo does have internal
maps of the "to-be-booted" kernels that are updated -- which is why
it is so fast at boot time and has fewer problems. It uses the running
OS's file drivers, while need a copy of every file driver for every system
it is going to work with -- as it dynamically reads the image at boot
time.
Avantages:
* lilo just has to read file blocks -- it doesn't have
to interpret or follow multiple file system structures.
* lilo can boot directly from the hard disk and doesn't
need a ramdisk or initrd. It's far more problematic to do so with
grub -- if it can be done at all.
* lilo uses the same device names as the linux kernel whereas
grub uses it's own, unrelated labeling system..

Disadvantages:
* if the kernel files are moved/updated, you must
run-lilo so it can record the new locations. Commonly, lilo can be
run as part of a kernel build & install step.
* when using the lilo command line, you cannot specify
file systems by 'label' or UUID. Device names are needed. Grub
supports labels and UUID's when boot with a ramdisk, as the ramdisk
contains software subsystems like 'udev' dmeventd, and lvm that allow
full access to the symbolic names for the devices.
* I believe the device names grub uses are generic names used
by 'smart bioses' (like EFI-boot), but am not certain about that; certainly
it's syntax is closer to the EFI-boot syntax than that of lilo's.


5.GRUB is more complicated to use while LILO is simpler and easier to use.
---
Oh yeah!

6.LILO is the old default boot loader for Linux while GRUB is the new
default boot loader.
====
*plegh*.
7.GRUB can be used for various other operating systems unlike LILO which
is used only for Linux operating systems.
----
This one has already been addressed.

I'd strongly question the objectiveness and accuracy of the article
you are getting information from.

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