Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (770 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-factory] Re: [opensuse] Re: Why bin & no bin64? => lets fix lib64=>lib, bin(32),lib(32)=>/usr32/{bin,lib}
On 07/31/2012 01:54 AM, Linda Walsh wrote:
Anyway -- I am not suggesting getting rid of 32bit support. Just putting
in a 32-bit specific /usr32/{bin/lib} (only because some programs I've seen
rely on ../lib or expectations...

Right. In essence, just implement the basic Linux FHS. Not the 'allowed' alternatives of /lib64, /usr32, just stick to the basic designations of /lib, /usr, etc.. And -- correctly implement those, i.e.:

/lib

Contains kernel modules and essential shared library images (the C programming code library) needed to boot the system and run the commands under /bin/ and /sbin/. Libraries are collections of frequently used program routines and are readily identifiable through their filename extension of *.so. They are essential for basic system functionality. Kernel modules (drivers) are in the subdirectory /lib/modules/<kernel-version>. To ensure proper module compilation you should ensure that /lib/modules/'kernel-version'/kernel/build points to /usr/src/'kernel-version' or ensure that the Makefile knows where the kernel source itself are located.

see: http://tldp.org/LDP/Linux-Filesystem-Hierarchy/html/lib.html

/usr

/usr usually contains by far the largest share of data on a system. Hence, this is one of the most important directories in the system as it contains all the user binaries, their documentation, libraries, header files, etc.... X and its supporting libraries can be found here. User programs like telnet, ftp, etc.... are also placed here. In the original Unix implementations, /usr was where the home directories of the users were placed (that is to say, /usr/someone was then the directory now known as /home/someone). In current Unices, /usr is where user-land programs and data (as opposed to 'system land' programs and data) are. The name hasn't changed, but it's meaning has narrowed and lengthened from "everything user related" to "user usable programs and data". As such, some people may now refer to this directory as meaning 'User System Resources' and not 'user' as was originally intended.

see: http://tldp.org/LDP/Linux-Filesystem-Hierarchy/html/usr.html

--
David C. Rankin, J.D.,P.E.
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