Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3351 mails)

< Previous Next >
Re: [opensuse] Time stability
  • From: "Carlos E. R." <robin.listas@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2007 01:51:33 +0100 (CET)
  • Message-id: <Pine.LNX.4.64.0703170135320.6667@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1


The Friday 2007-03-16 at 23:19 +0100, Roger Oberholtzer wrote:

> > Then you will have to get port pci cards, but if you are using 
> > portables, you are out of luck. pcmcia then?
> 
> No laptops. They do not survive regular use in road measurement. We
> already use PCI serial port cards. But they are so much more than a nice
> 16550-ish chip. Seems like a bit of overkill.

Well... it is what happens using out of the self hardware.


> > Very true. You have to wait till the clock is synced, but even then, it 
> > will be very slightly nudged now and then. But I suppose you can use the 
> > gps clock directly, instead of system time.
> 
> As a result of our synchronization, we do that: read the system clock
> and, using the offset determined at sync time, convert that to the gps
> time. So we never really require that we get gps data over the serial
> port in a deterministic fashion. Of course, if the PC system clock
> drifts, we are screwed.

I thought you were using the data message from the gps unit to get both 
position and time stamp to use in your calculations, ignoring computer 
system time. At least, that's how I would try to do it.

The system time without ntpd will surely drift, but constantly, no 
variation (hopefully). With ntpd it is supposed to be kept in sync with 
the "real world perfect time", but of course, you have to check if it is 
synced, and it will be slowed or accelerated now and then: thus variable 
drift. 

If the source for ntpd sync is a gps unit, it should be able, after a 
stabilization time, to keep almost perfect sync. Should. You would have to 
do measurements to ensure this is really so, I guess. Or study the source 
code to check what variations you cold be getting. And/or read ntpd 
documentation: I don't suppose they had precision measurements in mind 
when they designed it, but... maybe the did consider it and wrote about 
that somewhere..


The cmos clock drift and adjtime file is a completely different matter. It 
is only considered during boot and halt sequences; the intention is to set 
the system clock as accurately as possible, once: during start up. 
Unfortunately, it can misfire.

I wrote a small description of how suse handles this. It was included in 
the old unofficial suse faq, somewhere in sourceforge, time ago. You might 
find it interesting.


- -- 
Cheers,
       Carlos E. R.

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.5 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Made with pgp4pine 1.76

iD8DBQFF+zuXtTMYHG2NR9URAm3FAJ9t7OmO3E4CybCyZVQDkNLJ0j1qcQCglhOW
Qld5OvaPQ/eexHeKDGnhB0s=
=zdsb
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

-- 
To unsubscribe, e-mail: opensuse+unsubscribe@xxxxxxxxxxxx
For additional commands, e-mail: opensuse+help@xxxxxxxxxxxx

< Previous Next >
Follow Ups