Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (4634 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] 10.2 system clock too fast and NTP
  • From: ByteEnable <ByteEnable@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 16 Dec 2006 09:21:46 -0600
  • Message-id: <45840F0A.2090606@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Daniel Bauer wrote:
> On Saturday 16 December 2006 10:37, Jan Karjalainen wrote:
>
>> Anders Norrbring wrote:
>>
>>> ByteEnable wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> I'm using OpenSUSE 10.2 and my clock is running too fast. I turned on
>>>> NTP but NTP only works when its first run, then defaults back to the
>>>> local clock, which is the clock that is running too fast.
>>>>
>>>> This is a problem specific to 10.2. I've had OpenSUSE 10.1, Fedora Core
>>>> 5 and 6 on this same hardware without issues.
>>>>
>>> Are you possibly running this in a VMware virtual machine? If you are,
>>> add 'clock=pit' into your grub boot parameters. It's a known VMware
>>> issue.
>>>
>> I have the same problem with one of my machines, the clock runs way too
>> fast.
>> I have to run "rcntp restart" every 10 minutes to keep it somehow
>> adjusted...
>>
>>
> In my experiences ntp deamon adjust the time only if the difference is less
> than 3600 seconds. You can see in /var/log/ntp if there is a message like I
> had it:
>
> "time correction of -3600 seconds exceeds sanity limit (1000); set clock
> manually to the correct UTC time."
>
> My inital "time-problem" with a system clock running way too fast was
> discussed here:
> http://lists.suse.com/archive/suse-linux-e/2006-Mar/2932.html
>
> The suggested and helpful solution by Carlos E.R. in
> http://lists.suse.com/archive/suse-linux-e/2006-Mar/3273.html
> was:
>
> setup the clock by your prefered method
> hwclock --systohc
> rm /etc/adjtime
>
> It's important to remove /etc/adjtime after adjusting the time manually. The
> system will create a new /etc/adjtime later.
>
> Since I did the above my clock is as perfect as can be.
>
> regards
>
> Danie
>

I've tried what you have stated above. It does not help. After five
hours the clock was still off by -1060.096981 seconds according to
ntpdate time-a.nist.gov.

I've tried NTP daemon too:

14 Dec 22:26:39 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to 128.138.140.44, stratum 1
14 Dec 22:26:37 ntpd[12811]: time reset -1.472229 s
14 Dec 22:26:37 ntpd[12811]: kernel time sync enabled 0001
14 Dec 22:28:18 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to 128.138.140.44, stratum 1
14 Dec 22:29:07 ntpd[12811]: no servers reachable
14 Dec 22:29:45 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to 129.6.15.29, stratum 1
14 Dec 22:30:24 ntpd[12811]: no servers reachable
14 Dec 22:30:33 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to 128.138.140.44, stratum 1
14 Dec 22:31:15 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to LOCAL(0), stratum 10
14 Dec 22:32:56 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to 128.138.140.44, stratum 1
14 Dec 22:33:59 ntpd[12811]: synchronized to LOCAL(0), stratum 10
14 Dec 22:35:15 ntpd[12811]: ntpd exiting on signal 15

Bottom line is that something in OpenSUSE 10.2 is messed up! Too many
people complaining about the same issue.

Again, I've only had this issue with OpenSUSE 10.2, other Linux distro's
have worked flawlessly.

Byte
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