Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3666 mails)

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Re: [SLE] unsubscription
  • From: "Carlos E. R." <robin1.listas@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2005 00:14:07 +0100 (CET)
  • Message-id: <Pine.LNX.4.58.0503122119520.8009@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>

The Wednesday 2005-03-09 at 14:39 -0700, Brad Bourn wrote:

... skipped

I will not comment on the skipped parts, because others have done for me.
No need to add clutter :-)

> >Yes, I listen. But I can not accept it... it increases network and disk
> >usage across many computers and servers, and increases the time I need to
> >get the information I need to answer.
>
> what do you mean? like I said, there is more information for email clients to
> sort threads with. It is easier to navigate because each new piece of
> information is always at the top.

Threading is done scanning for three headers, the email content is
ignored:

References: ...
...
...
In-Reply-To: ....
Message-Id: ....

The "Message-Id" identifies, worldwide, the current message, and
"In-Reply-To" identifies the previous message. As the "Message-Id" is
guaranteed to be worldwide unique, the threading is exact and complete -
provided there are no broken mailers in use, such as ms exchange.

Including in the message the full previous message is superfluous, because
every body has it, and increases resources usage. It has to be transmitted
to all subscribers: and some, like me, use a modem. And some, again like
me, pay per minute of usage (others do by kilobyte). It means money to me.
Not much, but if everybody sends 10 kilobytes messages instead of 3 or 4,
I notice it.

It also means that archives get bigger with repeated information. Mine is
quite big already (more than 600Mb for two years).


> takes up too much space/speed? give me a break! this is text!

Yes. 10K transmit in about 2 or 3 seconds. It would be much worse if it
were html...

>
> When it comes to mixing both together, top, bottom, middle, full trim, full
> quote, like when you get hits in google on a long thread, it is the
> top-posting and full quoting that make it easier to navigate and find what
> your looking for.

Top posting means that the same search text is found several times,
because it is repeated in each answer full quoting it. The same mail is
found several times besides the original one. But I was not thinking of
google, lists are older than google.

>
> With the open-source community getting bigger, and the average newbie to linux
> NOT being a newbie to computers in general, I personally think it would be
> like shooting my livelyhood (the open-source community) in the foot by being
> an elitist and griping to contributers about style. We should have way more
> newbie professional / ex - MS folks than seasoned vets (hopefully read:linux
> for the masses -- converts in droves) real soon. By taking such an annoyed
> attitude you set yourself up for conflict and isolation.

¬°Good! :-P

Let ms-ish people adapt, not linux-ish adapt ;-)


But no, I used this style of mailing long before I met linux. It started
this way, before the explosion of internet (and even outside internet).
Top posting really caught in people from the business world that used
software from M$, which defaulted to top-posting. I don't object to
business using topposting if they like, and I answer top-post my self to
them.

But notice that in corporations, mail usually has a huge volume traffic,
with many mails bigger that 50 or 100 kilobytes. After three or four
resends, size increases 3-fold... meaning that a single server (one that
I'm thinking specially) hardly copes with more than a very few hundred
simultaneous users. They have to buy bigger servers and more licenses.
Good for business - other business, not theirs!

--
Cheers,
Carlos Robinson

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