Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (3666 mails)

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Re: [SLE] Video mode problem, can't get into Yast (Dell laptop)
  • From: Darryl Gregorash <raven@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2005 13:46:59 -0600
  • Message-id: <423C81B3.5020705@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Paul W. Abrahams wrote:

On Saturday 19 March 2005 1:27 pm, Carl E. Hartung wrote:


First, boot to run level 3 (no X.) I do this by just hitting the number "3"
key in grub before booting into SuSE.

Then log in as root and run "yast" to launch YaST2 in ncurses (text-based)
mode.

OK, that did it. Now I'm at the next problem (groan).

I can now get a legible screen. The problem with it is that it has a visual effect that I can best describe as a darker horizontal region that moves down the screen several times a second. I've been trying to find a monitor setting that eliminate that effect, with no success. The one that logically should do it -- Dell laptop @1024 -- does not do it. I've also tried the LCD monitor settings, and they are no better.

This sounds like it might be a beat frequency, which is caused by interference between two periodic signals having approximately the same frequency. In this case, one of the signals is the refresh (vertical) frequency of the monitor, while the other could be almost anything -- I have seen fluorescent lights interfere with a monitor set to refresh at approximately the same frequency as the electric company provides. Do you get the same effect when the room lights are off?

In sax2, once you have set the screen resolution, try setting the vertical frequency at a few different settings. I'd suggest trying 56, 60, 72 and 75 Hz for starters. The horizontal sweep rate shouldn't need changing. Make sure to test each before saving, and remember that you can always back out of the test with a keypress. Don't get carried away with too high a setting, however, as you can damage a monitor by setting its sweep frequencies outside specifications. Most modern monitors should be able to handle a vertical sweep up to at least 80 Hz, perhaps as high as 120 for some modes. Just keep the rate reasonably low until you find something that works.


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