Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (4547 mails)

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Re: [SLE] short fizzing sound
  • From: Thom Nuzum <linux@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 17 May 2004 15:55:14 -0400
  • Message-id: <200405171555.14134.linux@xxxxxxxxxxx>
I don't think I'll tough it.
I did have a tv repair lab course in the Air Force and we used discharge
rodes. bloody hell maybe its time for a tft thing.

On Monday 17 May 2004 15:45, Joao - Calcados Jacob S/A wrote:
> ... just one last thing obut monitors......
>
>
> DONĀ“T TOUCH THE TUBE!!!
>
> if You touch it, even after 10-15 minutes... it migth be a VERY shocking
> experience...
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "The Purple Tiger" <Jon@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: <suse-linux-e@xxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Monday, May 17, 2004 4:36 PM
> Subject: Re: [SLE] short fizzing sound
>
> > On Monday 17 May 2004 19:32, Thom Nuzum wrote:
> > > Yes its CRT.
> > > I think you must be right as I have tried everything else.
> > > How can I clean this without dying.
> > > Thanks
> >
> > It may also be a leaky capacitor, but we will start with the dust
> > theory :)
> >
> > Please be warned that this is done entirely at your own risk. Please
> > also note that the second option below isn't that difficult if you are
> > CAREFUL.
> >
> > If you don't feel confident taking the monitor apart (see below if you
> > do :)) then you can try the following:
> >
> > Get a can of "Pressurised Air".
> > Turn off the monitor, unplug it and leave it for 10-15 minutes for the
> > capacitors to discharge fully [so you don't go pop :)] .
> > Give the can a few short sharp blasts through all of the vent holes in
> > the monitor - the reason you only want short blasts is that it can be
> > very cold if you spray for a prolonged period (due to expansion of
> > gases causing a temperature drop) and may crack the tube.
> > Leave 10 minutes for it all the stabilise, dust to settle, etc.
> > Try the monitor.
> >
> > If you do feel confident about removing the case of your monitor (I have
> > done this faaaar too many times :) then move the monitor to a solid
> > work area, preferably wooden.
> > Leave it for 10-15 mins for the capacitors to discharge fully.
> > Lay a cloth/towel on the surface and lay the monitor CAREFULLY on its
> > front (glass) end.
> > Remove all the screws and carefully remove the back casing. You may
> > have to feed the cabling through the holes in the case.
> > Using a can of pressurised air and a soft paintbrush (for those stubborn
> > areas). BE CAREFUL NOT TO REMOVE ANY CONNECTORS, NOR TO KNOCK THE
> > CIRCUIT BOARD OFF THE BACK OF THE TUBE. Be careful not to move any of
> > the components on the boards too - most of them will stand up to light
> > brushing.
> > When you have finished your internal renovation work, carefully slide
> > the case back on (remembering to feed the cables [if required] as you
> > go).
> > Put your screws back in.
> > Leave 10 mins for the dust to settle.
> > Plug and pray :)
> >
> > If the problem persists after the second option then either you didn't
> > do a very good job, or a component part is on its way out. I have had
> > one go bang after it had been fizzing for a while, but I have yet to
> > break a monitor by taking it apart :g:.
> >
> > Just make sure it has been off for a little while (and by that I mean
> > that it has no power lead connected!) to make sure that all the
> > electricity is discharged from it.
> >
> >
> > Hope this helps :)
> >
> >
> > Jon
> >
> > --
> > Check the headers for your unsubscription address
> > For additional commands send e-mail to suse-linux-e-help@xxxxxxxx
> > Also check the archives at http://lists.suse.com
> > Please read the FAQs: suse-linux-e-faq@xxxxxxxx

--
Thom Nuzum
Realtor Technology Services
Washington DC, Virginia, and Maryland.

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