Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (933 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] Eee-pc hotkey config app.
  • From: Oddball <monkey9@xxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2010 11:46:27 +0200
  • Message-id: <4C0E1173.6050205@xxxxxx>
C schreef:
On Tue, Jun 8, 2010 at 10:24, Oddball wrote:

Malcolm showed me an extremely nice app for eee-pc:

http://greg.geekmind.org/eee-control/

I can feel some tension in this list towards this app, but cannot deny
the nice look and usefullness of this app.
Personaly i think this should be available also to KDE4 users.
This app might even consider me to change desktopmanager...


I looked at it... it's the same one I remember using back when I first
installed Linux on my Eee.

You said you use KDE4? I've found that the CPU scaling feature that
the eee-control provides is in a slightly different form in the Power
Management part of the KDE4 desktop config. The only thing you don't
get is a quick click applet to scale the CPU on the fly. That's
something I never did while using the applet anyway. I leave my Eee
on Dynamic while plugged in to the wall and it scales the CPU as
needed (I think that's teh equivalent of Normal on the applet). I've
set it to power save for when it's on battery.

Otherwise the applet gave me exactly the same mouse click features as
I got either through the Fn keys or the KNetwork manager (turning WiFi
on/off) and Systray applets (eg Bluetooth).

I haven't seen any way to re-assign the Fn keys to some other function
in KDE4 - not that I've tried since I don't need those Fn keys to do
anything other than the controls they are designed to do.

I took a look at the listed features....

# ACPI support for hotkeys, LCD brightness control and hardware toggles
They work out-of-the-box in 11.2 and 11.3, so this is redundant, no?

# Toggle hardware (WiFi, Bluetooth, card reader, webcam, touchpad) on and off
Can do this without the eee-control via the Fn keys.

# Easy graphical configuration of hotkey actions
This you cannot easily do (not that I've found) in regular KDE4 (can't
speak for Gnome)

# Better (finer granularity, more silent) fan control
This you cannot easily do in (not that I've found) regular KDE4 (can't
speak for Gnome)

# Extended LCD brightness (brighter and darker than the default range)
I remember being able to turn off the LCD completely using this
applet... to the point where I couldn't read the screen anymore. I
haven't seen the need for that, so don't miss it. The standard
brightness range that is accessible via the Fn+brightness keys has
been enough for me.

# Notifications/OSD (fully configurable)
KDE4 themes do most if not all of the on-screen notifications (eg
volume, brightness etc are shown in a progress bar, WiFi
enable/disable is shown in a popup etc). So... nothing missing I'm
aware of.

# Performance control (adjusts FSB and CPU voltage) for saving power
and/or overclocking
OK, this one is also not easily done without the applet.

# gnome-power-manager integration for automatic performance adjustment
Done by KDE4

# Monitor for hardware sensors (fan, temperature)
Done by KDE4 via desktop widgets.

So... other than overclocking, easily tweaking your fan speeds and
setting your brightness to zero... what are you missing in KDE4?
Serious question - I used to use this applet myself, and stopped using
it or looking for it when I installed 11.2 and all my Fn keys worked
without it.

C.

What you say i can imagine quit well, as it is candy.
Not to have it, while other distro's have it, is different.
Do you understand?
It is not you cann't do without it, but why if it is available?
And it looks real nice, good job done there, which i also appreciate much.

Take good things and make them work together is not so bad?

I decided before reading and answering this mail to install KDE, instead
of gnome btw..
I am performing a network -fresh install of M7 atm..(glad i did the
partitioning already yesterday, without knowing about the bug yet..
mountpoints could be imported, names edited and changed though.)

There are many apps on opensuse i do not use, and some i use, but are
not standard in the installation: Krusader and Thunderbird fi.

Assigning Function keys is something i used to do since my amiga era,
and especialy on this multifunctional little beauty it might come in
handy, i like using the keyboard, as the touchpad is quick with
activating or selecting, and way slower as a keyboard in general.
A config tool is mostly only used to adjust settings, but not having it
feels like missing something, especialy if it is available else where..
Besides that, to be taken serious as a distro, adjustable hardware
functions should be available in a graphical interface these days.
Things have to 'work', without fuss, these days, but i agree to the fact
that it takes a lot of time and work to get it that way..

--

Enjoy your time around,


Oddball, aka M9.


OS: Linux 2.6.27.19-3.2-default x86_64
Huidige gebruiker: oddball@AMD64x2-sfn1
Systeem: openSUSE 11.1 (x86_64)
KDE: 4.2.1 (KDE 4.2.1) "release 103"

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