Mailinglist Archive: opensuse (4498 mails)

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Re: [opensuse] Ballmer: Linux users owe Microsoft
  • From: Doug McGarrett <dmcgarrett@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2006 18:52:45 -0500
  • Message-id: <0J90006EO4ZPYGG0@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
At 04:02 PM 11/19/2006 -0600, Rajko M wrote:
>Content-Disposition: inline
>
>On Sunday 19 November 2006 11:32, Saill White wrote:
>...
>> You can do this yourself by going here and entering a company name for
>> "Term 1" and choosing "Assignee Name" for "Field 1":
>> http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/search-bool.html
>...
>
>Interesting link.
>
>I have feeling that this looks more like the Gordian Knot.
>
>Does anyone can explain this one:
>Apparatus and method for generating and using multi-direction DC and AC
>electrical currents #7,041,203
>
>I know that current can flow from + to -, also one can reverse polarity and
>than current will go in opposite way, but still from + to -. If reversal is
>done periodically than we call that alternating current, but multi-direction
>DC and AC?!
>
>Can someone shed some light on this?
>
>--
>Regards,
>Rajko M.
>--
In a mismatched transmission line, that is to say, for example, a 50 ohm
coaxial line terminated in 100 ohms, a reflection will exist. The current,
or voltage, will reflect from the 100 ohm mismatch, and this will propagate
down the line in the reverse direction. This applies to AC, and is usually
a high-frequency radio signal. The ratio of forward voltage to reverse
voltage is called the Voltage Standing Wave Ratio, or VSWR. I don't know
how this might be applied to DC, however.

--doug

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