Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-wiki (26 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-wiki] Why is this acceptable?
Helllo,

Am Sonntag, 1. Januar 2017, 14:16:44 CET schrieb PatrickD Garvey:
On Sun, Jan 1, 2017 at 1:02 PM, Sarah Julia Kriesch wrote:

Why do you say "Ms. Kriesch"? We are a community and speak with our
first names. I am a volunteer like you and I want to speak with you
as an equal.

I even heard people joking that saying "Mr./Ms. $lastname" to someone in
an open source project is a way to show you are mad at them ;-)

Yes, thank you, it does explain all I need to know to illustrate the
point I'm trying to share with you.

When one joins a group of other people for a purpose, one expects to
do some things that the group thinks are important, like keep your
private life disconnected from your corporate life in some cases and
associate it for the benefit of both in other cases, depending upon
the groups involved.

I would like to suggest that one of the things one should expect to do
when one joins a GNU/Linux distribution project is store one's output
somewhere that is obviously linked with the project, not on some
community server not associated with the project. I think I should
store anything I do for the openSUSE project somewhere in the
openSUSE.org domain, not in a RedHat.org or Canonical.org domain or a
SourceForge.net or GitHub.com domain.

You are overlooking an important point here - collaboration.

It doesn't make sense to think of "we" vs. "them" when it comes to other
distributions or upstream projects. It's quite the opposite - everybody
can save time by working together with other distributions, upstream
projects etc. We have more important things to do than re-inventing the
wheel just because we need a green one.

As an example: You might know that I maintain AppArmor in openSUSE and
also contribute upstream (OMG, the upstream mailinglist is
@lists.ubuntu.com, not at a "neutral" domain!)

Some not-so-known details:
- I implemented support for new AppArmor rule types (dbus, signal etc.)
in aa-logprof, but those are not yet supported in the upstream kernel
(and also not in openSUSE) - so currently only Ubuntu users benefit
from that
- I always send patches upstream so that everybody can benefit (no,
saying "use openSUSE, it's fixed there" is not a good idea ;-)
- In 2015, I visited DebConf (I'd guess I was the only one there who had
never used Debian before) and even gave a talk.
- I closely follow AppArmor-related bugreports in Debian and Ubuntu, and
help them to get things fixed - even if it's distro-specific

So, tell me - am I working for the enemy? ;-)


BTW: This isn't a one way road. Quite some AppArmor contributions done
by Ubuntu (some other upstream developers work for Canonical) and Debian
contributors end up in openSUSE :-)

Needless to say that AppArmor is just an example. What I said is
basically valid for every package, project, whatever. Either you
collaborate (and everybody wins), or you "cook your own soup" and never
find out that someone else has a receipe for a much more tasty soup ;-)


To come back to the origin of this discussion: I don't care too much
_where_ the Icecream developers host their documentation as long as
- it is complete and up to date (having it at the developers' favorite
place makes this more likely)
- it can be easily found (also not a problem, it's linked from the wiki,
and your favorite search engine will also find it)

I see the main purpose of the openSUSE wiki to provide openSUSE-specific
information.

Information about upstream projects (even if a project is done by
openSUSE) is "nice to have", but it's also ok if it lives upstream.
It's better have one good upstream documentation than pages at 5 distro
wikis that are all incomplete and out of date ;-)

Does that seem reasonable to you?

Please answer that yourself after reading the above ;-)


Regards,

Christian Boltz

PS: It seems my sigmonster [1] wanted to show an example of a bad place
for storing documentation ;-) (To make sure you get it right: The
problem is not Henne, the problem is that someone's brain is a bit
hard to read by others ;-)

[1] That's my script which randomly selects the signatures under my
mails - and sometimes I start to think it isn't as random as I'd
expect ;-)

--
<suseROCKs> henne: [...] Can you link me to any documentation [...]?
<henne> suseROCKs: brain://henne/hardware/touchsmart
<suseROCKs> Firefox: Oops! There appears to be no brain:// associated
with henne
[from #opensuse-project]

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