Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-edu (171 mails)

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RE: [suse-linux-uk-schools] Open file formats and idiology
  • From: "Chris Puttick" <Chris.Puttick@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2003 14:50:30 +0000 (UTC)
  • Message-id: <A6A6111EA1F21243B59777E68DA7D4570271D514@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
The big one is inclusion; all students in the school benefit because
everyone can freely use OO.org in the school or at home, regardless of
their financial situation.

If they are not employed by MS or a shareholder, the above should work.

If you want to get another support to your argument, try this: history
tells us the dominant player in any emerging technology sector *never*
remains dominant: Remington were once the world's number one supplier of
typewriters; Sony once dominated television supply (either direct or by
CRT supply); Novell were the name in SME file and print servers;
Netscape was the only web browser anyone serious ever used; and of
course WordPerfect was once the word processor of choice. Training a
child to use a set of packages that, even if MS retains their dominance
until that child leaves higher education, will be changed beyond all
recognition seems pointless. It is highly unlikely that a Microsoft
world will continue; to give the child the best chance, they need
transferable skills.

(for references on the above, see any site about history of science and
technology)

On the open file formats, my partner is the absolute expert (archives
and records management). I'll get her input to you ASAP.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Johnson [mailto:johnsonmlw@xxxxxxxxx]
Sent: 27 November 2003 14:14
To: SuSe
Subject: [suse-linux-uk-schools] Open file formats and idiology


Hi all,

A rallying cry for some assistance in a scary world.

We're thinking of replacing MS Office here (97) with
Oo.o 1.1 (to be honest, it's going to happen!). I've
received a letter from a parent who is "alarmed" that
we may be considering any alternatives to Microsoft,
expressing how important it is for her child to be in
a Microsoft environment because of the real world (I'm paraphrasing -
not her words).

I'm arguing along three lines...

*Practicality (cost/budget/product features).

*Educationally (we're teachers not trainers)

*Idiologically (free thinking, open standards and
specifically open file formats).

Could anyone point me to some web resources for the
definition of "educating" rather than "training" that
would enhance my point. And also resources that
support the case for "open file formats" versus
proprietory (and thus I suppose opensource in general
versus proprietory - although maybe this wouldn't
directly help as we're at least "looking at Star
Office". Hmm). The more professional the body of any
report's author, the better I suppose (do Becta cover
this stuff?). Any articles at all would be great.

Cheers

--
Matt Johnson



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