Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-buildservice (207 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-buildservice] Making kernel module for kernels in HEAD
On Monday 21 March 2011, 19:40:42 Greg KH wrote:
On Mon, Mar 21, 2011 at 05:36:55PM +0100, Roger Oberholtzer wrote:
On Mon, 2011-03-21 at 09:24 -0700, Greg KH wrote:
On Mon, Mar 21, 2011 at 05:17:30PM +0100, Roger Oberholtzer wrote:
OBS has been making kernel modules for me for quite a while. It
works great making them for openSUSE 11.2/3/4, or an update.

On a semi-related note, what kernel modules are you building that
are not already included in the main kernel.org sources? Any
pointers to them anywhere?

They are in my project on the Build Service. One is for a local
card and is probably of little use to anyone other than us. There
is one for a VME interface access device. It has been modified for
our use. All is in the project. I really doubt these are things
many folk are interested in.

You should send these upstream so you don't have to constantly update
them.

And the myth of "it is only of use to us" I debunked many many years
ago, please see:
http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/ols_2006_keynote.html

Hi Greg,

I have an project, that could use serious support:

aufs2, http://sourceforge.net/projects/aufs

It provides a service, that many diskless and other projects rely on,
and the reason for rolling my own kernel trees..

There's a downside: Al don't like the project, he promotes union mount
and now overlayfs: the former looks like a (now orphaned) toy project
of Valerie Aurora, which never left conceptual state, while the latter
falls short with NFS, and likely many other more complex tasks in this
regard.

The one, that is heavily used in production environments with serious FS
layering needs, is aufs and aufs2, respectively. In order to build
aufs2 as a kernel module, it needs access to a handful of functions,
that aren't exported (yet). It constantly getting less symbols, since
other advanced modules need more and more of them, too.

The kernel could provide a _strong_ diskless support since years. FS
layering provides exactly that. Install you favorite Linux distribution
once, and use it with as many diskless (desktop) systems as you like.
All it takes is tweaking the mount process, where the (NFS) root FS
gets layered with a unique one for the system, and be done. That can be
a tmpfs, or even another NFS tree to provide persistent setups.

One can do many creative things with layered FS, once you have access to
it and the functionality isn't as crippled as in the other mentioned
projects..

BTW, Junjiro Okajima is a really talented kernel hacker. Note the
various hints and patches for the rcu-based vfs work. Being a real
japanese, he's just bad in selling himself adequately..

Please feel free to send these to me and I will be glad to work with
you to get them upstream so you don't have to mess with this type of
thing in the future.

Pete
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