Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-buildservice (171 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-buildservice] python, buildarch, and post build checks
  • From: Michael E Brown <Michael_E_Brown@xxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2009 13:44:37 -0500
  • Message-id: <20090902184437.GA19232@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
On Wed, Sep 02, 2009 at 01:21:56PM -0500, Jon Nelson wrote:
Using openSUSE.org:openSUSE:11.1:Update as my remote repo, I've been
getting errors like this:

python-setuptools:
"/usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages/setuptools/command/setopt.pyc" is
not allowed in a noarch package.

However, /usr/lib64/python2.6 is where the python installation is located.

I see two conflicting problems here:

1. the package really is arch independant. .pyo and .pyc files are,
this provides no shared libraries, etc...
2. the python install is directing the package to usr /usr/lib64

I don't want to remove the BuildArch: noarch directive, as the package
really is noarch.

Where *should* the package be installing so that it doesn't trigger this
issue?

Also, how do I turn off individual post-build checks (like the bz2
check) for local OBS instances?

I am having a very similar problem.

https://build.opensuse.org/package/live_build_log?arch=x86_64&package=libsmbios&project=isv%3Adell%3Acommunity&repository=suse-factory-x86_64
======
RPM build errors:
File not found by glob:
/usr/src/packages/BUILDROOT/libsmbios2-2.2.17-4.7.x86_64/usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages/*
System halted.
======

It looks to me like python and rpm disagree over what py_sitedir should be. I
have this in my spec file:
# per fedora and suse python packaging guidelines
# suse: will define py_sitedir for us
# fedora: use the !? code below to define when it isnt already
%{!?py_sitedir: %define py_sitedir %(%{__python} -c "from
distutils.sysconfig import get_python_lib; print get_python_lib()")}

And then I use "%{py_sitedir}/*" in my %files list. It looks like py_sitedir is
set to one thing and python is installing the files elsewhere.
--
Michael
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