Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-project (382 mails)

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Re: [opensuse-project] Introducing the Freight Train
  • From: Guido Berhoerster <gber@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 8 May 2012 11:04:32 +0200
  • Message-id: <20120508090431.GC2481@hal>
* Andreas Jaeger <aj@xxxxxxxx> [2012-05-07 21:46]:
I'm liking that we're referring to openSUSE as upstream from SLEx rather
than "basis of SLEx" as we have done in the past. The difference in
message and intent between the single word "upstream" vs. "basis" is
significant and upstream shows that openSUSE is truly meant to be a
community project. The growing pervasiveness of referring to
"upstream" is alone a big step forward for us.

I doubt that this has much practical significance due to the
personnel overlap. The overwhelming majority of development work
on the core distribution is already done by community members
employed by SUSE, so this whole upstream - downstream distinction
is more of a theoretical nature.

It has nothing to do with personnel overlap - the point is more the
relationship between the two of them. While there might be many
things that SLE engineers like to see in openSUSE, the openSUSE
community might not like it and has IMHO the power to veto it.

For example, if grub2 is not working in time for openSUSE 12.2, we
as openSUSE community should say it's not time to use it by default
etc - even if further testing might be beneficial for SLE.

With personnel overlap I didn't only mean the cases where SLE
personell maintains openSUSE packages but also that many of those
who maintain the core distribution are employed by the same
company that produces SLE.

But we have in 2011 more non-SUSE folks contributing - so if we
vote, the non-SUSE folks would win ;)

True, there is a large wider community, but then generally we
don't vote on technical matters or have a formal decision-making
process on technical matters like e.g. Fedora.

[*] e.g. ~80% of all changes to all Factory packages in 2010 and
2011 are authored by SUSE employees

With my scripts I get 72 % for 2010 and 56 % for 2011 (checking
single entries in .changes (and I know that some SUSE employees use
a non-SUSE address there, so handled those specifically).

Just out of curiousity, do you have detailed statistics available
somewhere? I have polished my script a bit and put the results up
at
http://heapoverflow.de/tmp/factory-changes-2009.txt
http://heapoverflow.de/tmp/factory-changes-2010.txt
http://heapoverflow.de/tmp/factory-changes-2011.txt
These are of course just a rough indicator, contributions are
almost impossible to quantify and above results are skewed e.g.
by mass changes or excessive changelog entries of packages like
kiwi.
--
Guido Berhoerster
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